Orange and lemon Marmalade

I had a cunning plan to get people to visit me.  I have an orange tree, and so I announced that I was going to make marmalade.  Anyone who wished could come along with a jar and some sugar, and join the fun.  Great response.  I now have three bags of lemons to add to the treeful of oranges, and the marmalade party has turned into a full fledged barbecue event.  

Here is the recipe I propose to use.  It is one we devised long ago when us youngsters gathered to use up citrus fruit that we grew.  I call it Orange and lemon Marmalade, but it could equally be any citrus fruit or combination, bearing in mind that limes need additional pectin from somewhere, such as grapefruit, or other fruit such as crabapples. 

INGREDIENTS

  1. Whole oranges   
  2. Whole lemons 
  3. With or without other citrus fruit
  4. Water equal in volume to the chopped whole fruit
  5. Sugar equal in volume to the cooked fruit pulp.  Mix white and brown sugar for a darker marmalade with a more “traditional” flavour

Preparation

  1. Peel the oranges and lemons and slice the peel thinly.
  2. Trim as much white pith from fruit as possible and discard.
  3. Chop fruit, discarding all seeds. (or put the seeds in a muslin bag and add to the pulp)
  4. Measure chopped fruit and place in heavy saucepan.
  5. Add an equal amount of water. Bring to boil. Lower heat and simmer for 20 minutes.  
  6. Measure or estimate the volume of the cooked pulp
  7. Add an equal amount of sugar.  
  8. Return to the boil over medium heat.
  9. Simmer, stirring constantly, but gently, for at least 20 minutes, or until mixture begins to gel.
  10. Check that the marmalade sets on a cool saucer
  11. Immediately bottle in hot sterilized jars.
  12. Cover and seal.

 

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About Alan

Alone in a sea of spinifex.
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3 Responses to Orange and lemon Marmalade

  1. Pingback: Carrot Cake | Kummerspeck

  2. Pingback: The Weekend. | Flitting Amongst The Swanplants

  3. Pingback: Iascaire agus oráiste agus liomóidí | Flitting Amongst The Swanplants

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